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So even if you do things legally and the courts acquit you you still get deported?


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55 minutes ago, Jollygoodfellow said:

Website of restaurant

From the website: "PRICES & INGREDIENTS
may change without prior notice!"

Stay tuned, folks.  They's a'changin'

Not to worry though.  There's a good chance the foreigner will console the right person with cash and we will never here of it again.

Edited by Dave Hounddriver
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What nonsense. This guy has ran a family restaurant here for 25 years. He was found to be doing things legally but then they want to deport him anyway. In a news report they say he is taking Filipinos

If only Western nations had similar immigration protocols!  

It is the above statement is the part that bothers me the most.   And I would not be surprised if the restaurant now goes out of business leaving the Filipino workers to try and find new jobs.

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Never ever forget where you live is also called The Land That Logic forgot.

No logic to this case as its represented here......sometimes all you can do is shake your head at some of the nonsense that happens here and just get on with your day.

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Is it so different to protocols in place in other countries, though?  It's hardly controversial that sufficient evidence to prove a criminal case isn't there, but there may be enough to satisfy a lesser test.

Again, I seem to be swimming against the tide but on the face of it, it's not so hard to understand it can legitimately happen.  

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9 hours ago, Dave Hounddriver said:

Some of us have said all along that these things happen while other members say these things are all stories.  Hands up all who are surprised at this.

The previous discussion IIRC was on the subject of people being deported on the say-so of an angry wife/partner/neighbour etc - this is not the same at all as there was sufficient evidence to pursue a court case.  

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56 minutes ago, hk blues said:

Is it so different to protocols in place in other countries, though?  It's hardly controversial that sufficient evidence to prove a criminal case isn't there, but there may be enough to satisfy a lesser test.

Again, I seem to be swimming against the tide but on the face of it, it's not so hard to understand it can legitimately happen.  

 

I do understand what you're saying and as far as it goes I agree with you and even with the courts there are different levels of proof required depending upon the type of case.  A criminal case requires a higher level of proof than a civil case.  I'm not sure about the definition there but in Oz a criminal trial conviction requires "beyond reasonable doubt" but a civil case is decided "on the balance of probabilities".

A high profile case in the US some years back suggests it is similar there, for example the very high profile cases where OJ Simpson was found 'not guilty' at the criminal trial but responsible at the Civil trial for the deaths.

An administrative ruling generally requires an even lower standard of proof.

Edited by GeoffH
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3 hours ago, Dave Hounddriver said:

From the website: "PRICES & INGREDIENTS
may change without prior notice!"

Stay tuned, folks.  They's a'changin'

Not to worry though.  There's a good chance the foreigner will console the right person with cash and we will never here of it again.

 

F861DD76-8F0C-431A-B700-8B6FC0C8E82A.jpeg

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5 hours ago, Explorer said:

This is the law, DEPORTATION OF ALIENS, Sec. 37, #11

"Any alien who engages in profiteering, hoarding, or black-marketing, independent of any criminal action which may be brought against him;"

This doesn't need moral justification because it's how every nation should handle foreigners.

However the PH has some laws that only apply to citizens, meaning foreigners can't even be charged, such as libel or 'cyber libel'.

In those cases, deportation isn't just one solution, it's the only solution.

However in this specific case, the foreigner was charged with a crime because they were handling him in the courts, instead of the BI.

So it may have been in his best interest to just pay the fine and/or do the time.

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1 hour ago, hk blues said:

The previous discussion IIRC was on the subject of people being deported on the say-so of an angry wife/partner/neighbour etc - this is not the same at all as there was sufficient evidence to pursue a court case.  

"sufficient evidence to pursue a court case." lost.  "the say-so of an angry wife/partner/neighbour etc" wins.  Seems the same to me.

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5 hours ago, scott h said:

we must assume he is married to a Pinay and the restaurant is under her name. If it is not then he should be deported for being stupid :hystery:.

Not necessarily. He probably had a corporation, 60/40 on paper. 

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2 hours ago, Dave Hounddriver said:

"sufficient evidence to pursue a court case." lost.  "the say-so of an angry wife/partner/neighbour etc" wins.  Seems the same to me.

You don't see the burden of proof as being very different in the 2 situations?

OK. 

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