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Trash or Basura Burning


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Not sure whether to topic post this under Health, Safety & Security, Culture or something else, but I would like to get some ideas on it regarding effective local family incineration practices.

I do NOT want to get into the whinging and complaints of your neighbors' bad and offensive practices, so much, as its not going to stop the practice here in the PI.  Rather, I am interested in more effective methods of burning.

I did a brief search here and not much came up.  I checked on Lazada, and this is what I found.

https://www.lazada.com.ph/products/haoyunla-1-set-stainless-steel-burn-barrel-household-incinerator-furnace-burning-bin-i2321397665-s10526176295.html?spm=a2o4l.searchlist.list.8.428d781dqTxqaT&search=1&freeshipping=1

Basically, a small light steel perforated bucket on small legs with a lid. Selling for P1K to P 1.5K.

Like it or not, sweeping up yard debris (dead leaves, twigs, etc.) and setting it afire, is a common and daily practice here. Often, other burnable trash is thrown in. Often light plastics etc., are included. Most people have separate sacks for the plastic or metal non-burnables that the basura trucks pick up, but a lot of things get openly burned up here that would not be in other countries or places that have monitored and enforced burning codes.

I told my wife that we should get a burn barrel/container for better incineration, and she said she would check at the local market and discount stores, but doesn't recall seeing such things for sale.

I see that the secondary gas and smoke burn technology from woodstoves that we use in the cold forest lads is now appearing in recreational woodfire burn pits. (see Youtube videos if interested). The ones they home build are too costly for common use here from what I see, but maybe not. They have an airtight metal ring around the inside of the pit with holes at the top and the outer circle of concrete brick is separated from it by a few inches, with bottom inlets to bring in fresh oxygenated air, pre warm it and inject it into the top smoke and unburned gas that come off the burn for secondary combustion. 

I guess I could have one made pretty inexpensively by a local, since there is no way I can probably stop my wife from her tradition.

Any ideas or better methods for improving the yard burning practices?

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2 hours ago, manofthecoldland said:

Any ideas or better methods for improving the yard burning practices?

A few years back the galvanized pressure tank seam cracked.  I cut the top out and it makes a very nice small burning barrel.   You might find one at the scrap dealer for cheap or even buy a new one for 2000 peso (Lazada).  I think it would be more sturdy than the stainless one.  They are very heavy gauged galvanized.  

 

IMG_20211107_110817.jpg

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I paid 200 pesos for an old 55 gallon oil drum, which I will have converted into a burner, with the help of a relly and his welding equipment....when I get round to it.  :89:

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2 hours ago, manofthecoldland said:

Like it or not, sweeping up yard debris (dead leaves, twigs, etc.) and setting it afire, is a common and daily practice here.

The wife tells me they generally burn the leaves and twigs at dusk for smoke to get rid of mosquitoes, I suppose getting rid of any rubbish is all the same to them. :whatever:

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Our house came with a cement trash receptacle about 4 ft x 8 ft and 5 ft high divided into 2 compartments. I suppose one side is for burnables and the other is for more burnables. :89:

Inquiry at the barangay hall paid off. We can bring bagged trash there on Tuesdays and it will be disposed of. The barangay's garbage truck has been in need of repair for ages.

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Could make a compost heap,not that hard to make just add trash (rubbish)and you could chop up your old xmas tree and chuck that on.:xmastree:

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We save all our recyclables for bro-in-law. He takes them away and gets a few pesos for the stuff, so only really leaving bits of card, plastic bags,  and paper for us to burn. (No basura collection service here). 

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11 hours ago, graham59 said:

I paid 200 pesos for an old 55 gallon oil drum, which I will have converted into a burner, with the help of a relly and his welding equipment....when I get round to it.  :89:

Growing up that’s we used. My dad fashioned a grate to put in the bottom of the barrel out of some thick rebar ….. similar to the grating used for fireplaces, then punched a few holes around the base with a chisel. Every once I while we’d have to tip it over to clean out the ashes. The ashes went into the compost pile. Non burnables, like glass and larger plastic bottles went to the landfill (or a dumpster behind the local grocery store, lol). 

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Yes we used a 44 with air holes near the base so the fire could breathe as well however the new oil drums are a lot thinner than the older drums and a lot less metal used to make them... they'll still work but they don't last as long.

Edited by GeoffH
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Burning rubbish is illegal here in our city and Barangay, we have a regular barangay truck 2-3 days a week which picks up sacks, all our empty bottles,tins and cardboard we sell for a few pesos our Barangay is very strict on this and espec strict also on illegal parking 

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