110 Volt Power

Recommended Posts

Posted

I thought it best to open a new topic for this...

I have a - hopefully - simple question. Since the electrical grid here in Davao runs 110 volts in both legs of the supply system, has anyone tried connecting North American 110 volt appliances or motors using just the one leg to power and the other leg to ground? I know, it would require a small bit of connection hassle, but I am thinking it might eliminate the need for a 220-110 volt transformer?

  • Hmm thinking 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Forum Support
Posted
21 minutes ago, Tommy T. said:

Since the electrical grid here in Davao runs 110 volts in both legs

If you have 2 lines coming in with 110 per line and 1 neutral line then surely you can use 110 off one leg.  I think there are other places with 2 x 110 where that works too.

I believe most of the Philippines is 1 x 220 line because they can service longer distances and more houses off each line (higher voltage = less voltage drop) and because higher voltage can be transmitted on smaller gauge wires.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)
13 minutes ago, Dave Hounddriver said:

If you have 2 lines coming in with 110 per line and 1 neutral line then surely you can use 110 off one leg. 

Hi Dave... Thanks for the input. The situation here is that there are only two lines on the power grid - each is a 110 volt leg. There is no neutral line... or else I missed something. I had an electrician install a ground rod and some grounding wires for a few outlets here, but there are, otherwise only two wires - 110 volts each - and that's it. Am I missing something?

Otherwise, your info and logic are perfect. Higher voltage equals smaller wires and makes the most sense. But, for some reason unknown to me, this area uses 110 volts on each of two lines with no neutral or ground...

I only learned this when there was a shorted wire on this house outlet grid.  When I asked the electrician why he couldn't just do a simple switch-a-roo on part of the system, he explained the system to me about the two wire 110 volts... I was (no pun intended) a bit shocked! I had no idea that this area (Davao) was wired this way...

So everything here, in this house, is wired such that one wire is switched while the other is direct to the outlet or light. So 110 volts should be everywhere. It is a crazy (to me) system and there is nothing to do about it now since it is all installed and working - mostly...

Edited by Tommy T.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)
9 hours ago, Tommy T. said:

the electrical grid here in Davao runs 110 volts

With 110 volt electricity in Davao, it  sounded like Davao is possibly located in some type of Time Portal linked to the late 1800’s.

Well, I was wrong since the following countries all have 110 volt electrical systems.

Mainly North American and South American countries use 110 volts standard wall outlet [but the] full list is:

Virgin Islands (USA)
Virgin Islands (British)
Venezuela
United States Virgin Islands
United States of America (USA)
Turks and Caicos Islands
Trinidad & Tobago
Taiwan
Suriname
Saudi Arabia*
Saint Vincent and the Grenadines*
Saint Maarten
Saint Eustatius*
Saba
Puerto Rico
Panama
Palau
Nicaragua
Micronesia, Federated States of
Mexico
Marshall Islands
Liberia
Japan (100 volts)
Jamaica
Honduras
Guatemala
Guam
El Salvador
Dominican Republic
Curacao
Cuba
Costa Rica
Colombia
Cayman Islands
Canada
British Virgin Islands
Brazil*
Bonaire
Bermuda
Belize
Barbados
Bahamas
Aruba
Anguilla
American Samoa.
*marked countries use both 110 and 220 volts standard wall outlet.

Edited by Major Tom
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Posted

Here in Subic Bay Freeport the old US Navy houses had 110 and 220 outlets.  When I move in I had all the 110 switched to 220 and the contractor said it was simple, so I guess it is like yours.

My Craftsman impact drill from the US runs a bit slow on 110.  Should be 120.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Posted
15 hours ago, Tommy T. said:

has anyone tried connecting North American 110 volt appliances or motors using just the one leg to power and the other leg to ground?

Tommy,   We have the same electrical system in Sta Rosa, Laguna.  My house is wired the same as yours except I had a ground run to each outlet.  In my workshop I wired both 110 and 220 outlets and marked them well so as not to make a mistake.  The 110v outlets worked fine using one hot and the other to ground.  I shipped several machines and power tools from the US and each worked very well without issues.  BTW, with my solar system I can easily check my incoming voltage at the panel.  I found provided power from the electric company to always be about 235v.  Checking several sources I learned this is not unusual and I never had a issue.  Also I do have an AVR to most of the house. 

  • Like 2
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Forum Support
Posted

Found this on another website (blog so no URL posted).  Learn something new everyday. :thumbsup:

<snip>

TYPES OF ELECTRICAL SERVICE IN THE PHILIPPINES. There are two main types of residential electrical service in the Philippines.

MANILA AND CITIES: Three wire 120/240V Systems.  In Manila, Iloilo City and other large Philippine cities, residences are supplied with 240 volt, alternating current, 60 cycle power.  Power from the utility transformer to the residence arrives through three wires, two 120 VAC load (“hot”) wires and a single neutral.  Circuits in the residence are generally wired to supply 240 VAC to outlets using the two 120 VAC load wires, much the same as a heavy appliance (dryer, hot water heater etc.) would be supplied in the U.S. All small and large appliances sold in the Philippines are designed to use 240 VAC, 60C.

However, it is possible to wire in 120 VAC circuits and outlets by using only one of the load wires and a neutral.  These 120 V outlets are seen in hotels, some condos and other places which expect American visitors.   Visitors must keep in mind that the Philippines uses the same style of wall outlets as you see in America, but that the outlet is supplying 240 V, not 120 V.  Plugging a 120 V appliance into a 240 V outlet will generally destroy the appliance.

It seems likely that the American-style 120 / 240  VAC 60 cycle used in Manila may have been the result of the fact that electrical systems in Philippine cities were expanded during the American occupation of the Philippines between 1899 and WWII.  There may be areas around the big former U.S. military bases (Clark and Subic) which are wired for 120 VAC service.

OUTSIDE OF BIG CITIES: Two wire 230V Systems  Areas outside of the old established cities were electrified later and use a different and more economical system using a two wire service drop to the residence.  This consists of one 230 VAC load wire and one neutral wire.  120 VAC cannot be supplied by this type of system unless the property owner, at his own expense and with the cooperation of the utility company, installs his own transformer at the utility pole, a transformer having a secondary winding which can supply 120 VAC.  This is not impossible as many utility transformers are recycled from the U.S., but it is expensive and in our view the 230 V systems are better unless the homeowner ships expensive appliances from the U.S.  It will be difficult to find parts and service for these imported 120 V appliances.

Much of the rest of the world runs on 220-240 VAC but 50 cycle rather than 60 cycle found in the Philippines, creating a problem in importing some European appliances for use in the Philippines.

<end snip>

  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Posted

Yeah... the 50 vs 60 cycle causes minor issues with my USA power tools...they run a bit slower than "normal." But it is not a big deal and doesn't seem to harm anything. You would think it might make more sense - and be much cheaper - to simply run all wiring as 220 volt everywhere? The wires can be much smaller (i.e. less copper so cheaper). I like the concept of 220 vs 110 - it makes so much more sense to me...

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Posted
6 hours ago, Tommy T. said:

Yeah... the 50 vs 60 cycle causes minor issues with my USA power tools...they run a bit slower than "normal." But it is not a big deal and doesn't seem to harm anything. 

The other way around has been known to cause problems, 50Hz power tools run on 60Hz run faster than "normal" which can cause premature wear and failure.

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)

I am going to continue this topic, even though it might be a bit long on being appropriate?

Yesterday, the power grid dropped at about 3pm. It only returned today at 9am. There have been a number of power outages during the past 2 years we have lived here. I have had enough, so will soon stop by at the local Ace store to buy a generator. I want to buy one that is strong enough to power our refrigerator and freezer and maybe the A/C in our bedroom, along with other small gadgets that require charges... I am thinking it needs to supply about .500kw?

Any suggestions from the members?

Edited by Tommy T.
  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...