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Gratefuled

We probably don't think much about it but what if?

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Queenie O.    2,514

We hadn't been living here permanently when super typhoon Yolanda arrived or when a couple of earthquakes hit our area, but our house weathered those incidents as told by my brother in law who was staying at our house at the time. 

My neighbors recalled that one of my African Tulip trees crashed over the gate at the family compound, the next town over and fell across the road causing trouble.

Here I guess,  you might worry about anything or everything or nothing at any given time, but other than storing extra water, and having strong shelter for our dogs we don't think much about natural disasters.  I find that I live much more "in the moment" than I ever have had in the past.

Edited by Queenie O.
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Queenie O.    2,514

A lot of truth to what you say about many areas Jake. I must say though, that the benefits of a lot of national and international aid that reached our affected area of northern Cebu province has made a difference and continues to make living standards better for many.  Yes there was some initial political grabbing at first, but many local corporations have now built new permanent housing, even whole new barangays for people in low lying areas and those who lost everything. New schools have replaced ones that were destroyed in nearby Bogo City. Provincial hospitals in some areas received new equipment left by participating international medical missions. The International Red Cross just recently turned over a new blood bank for northern Cebu in Bogo City. Towns further up the coast are still getting help from local and some international workers.

In the event of any disasters out here in the province though, I guess it's a given that the people with the most will be sought out by the people with the least. We told our brother in law to help out who he could, and our house became a temporary refuge for nearby fishermen during the height of Yolanda.

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Gratefuled    3,297
6 hours ago, Kuya John said:

It's a case of choosing to be on the coast or further inland and risk earthquakes.

Some areas are less proned than other's to Typhoon

All the Philippines is at risk of earthquakes and some are in danger of active volcanoes erupting. 

Coast lands are susceptible to tsunamis.

Some areas are more prone to typhoon damage than others. Davao is not one of them. I don't know why.

I have cracks in  my walls that I did not notice before until after an earthquake. 

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Gratefuled    3,297
3 hours ago, Queenie O. said:

Here I guess,  you might worry about anything or everything at any given time, but other than storing extra water, and having strong shelter for our dogs we don't think much about natural disasters.  I find that I live much more "in the moment" than I ever have had in the past.

The same with me. I seldom think about a natural disaster until one occurs nearby. If they didn't happen so frequently, I might feel a lot more at ease. I'm as prepared as possible but still would like to be back home. 

Funny but back home even if one doesn't feel the mild earthquake we know there was one when car alarms go off and dogs start howling. Look outside and the water in the swimming pool  has ripples. Then, we try to guess the epicentre and how strong it was.

 

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Mr-T    112

Out here in the province we live inland with mountains surrounding us, like in a big valley. Somewhat protected from the strong typhoons as the wind goes high. Biggest concern is flooding as we live down below from a large dam. Often when the dam is high they release water which results in flooding for the neighbours as there houses are built low to the ground. No land filling or built up. We fill our lot by about three meters up when we build so very little chance of flooding.

Now earth quake is another matter, no control over that but we build with lots of steel so hopefully the house will stay secure. Not active volcanos around. We always have extra can goods and food stuff. We also have a pump well in case of the town water not flowing. So i am not really worried except for the loss of electric power which will occur.

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Jollygoodfellow    13,060
19 hours ago, Dave Hounddriver said:

I just had a huge mother of a mirror installed as a headboard

Um, I'm sure you told me it was mounted on the ceiling :SugarwareZ-004:

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Kuya John    3,322
9 hours ago, Queenie O. said:

That's true Kuya, btw are you referring to Dave's mirror?

Yes;:hystery:

Gratefuled,

I visited Leyte after Yolanda, apart from road repairs at that time, very little could be seen to have been done.

People were still living in tent's just a few hundred yards from the beach near to the Gen;MacArthur statues.

Spent my honeymoon on Camiguin island, it wasn't till I asked how they warm the water I was swimming in, that I found out

we were next to a volcano, apparently one of seven on the island!

Beautiful place to visit and recommend it, out of eruption season of course :56da64b51da2f_36_1_681:

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Steve GCC    498

Similar to others, lots of steel and good materials on the house build.  Raised it 1m even tho no risk of flooding locally.  Kept the hadn pump on the well so dont rely on the pressure tank/pump.  And always sacks of rice...............

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