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On 6/24/2018 at 5:33 PM, sonjack2847 said:

 That would be nice if it worked.I have tried quite a few times but there always seems to be the excuse yes sir but you have to pay for this even when I have asked for the price of everything needed.

I guess sit at the bar and eat; pay one by one for your drinks could be good strategy

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10 minutes ago, AwesomeLife said:

I guess sit at the bar and eat; pay one by one for your drinks could be good strategy

In the UK it is that way, always has been for me. You know where you are when buy one, Drink one comes into play but here, as in a lot of Countries this table(Bar) tab thing is open to problems, also they never have change for this routine  :whistling:

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23 hours ago, AwesomeLife said:

I guess sit at the bar and eat; pay one by one for your drinks could be good strategy

If it could be like that it would be utopia but as was stated they don`t have change for that.Anyway it mostly happens when buying something like maybe a PC and then they say oh but you have to pay for the leads to connect the equipment without which you cannot use the stuff.And this comes about after you have said give me the price for all the equipment I need.

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On 6/25/2018 at 3:29 AM, Mike J said:

We have sponsored a number of children by paying for their tuition, but this was at a private Christian based school.  It would be more of a challenge for a public school where you would have to buy supplies, uniforms, etc and give them to students.  We also paid 4 years of college tuition for a young lady who now has her degree in criminology/law enforcement.  Putting a  non-relative through college is a risk, but we are hoping that we can break the cycle of poverty for her.   We were able to attend her graduation this April and to see her tears of joy and appreciation was truly gratifying.  So yes, sometimes money can buy happiness . . . .  even if it is for someone else. 

My wife and I have discussed the sponsorship approach several times. Our idea is to give P500 per month to pay for miscellaneous expenses while the child is attending school. That would amount to P5,000 per year (10 months school year) or about $100. The problem is we have no way of determining whether or no the student is receiving and using the money for school unless we were residing in the community.

 

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1 hour ago, JJReyes said:

The problem is we have no way of determining whether or no the student is receiving and using the money for school unless we were residing in the community.

I agree completely.  The other advantage to being here is meeting the child and monitoring their progress.  It helps establish accountability with the child and I think they work a little harder knowing that the sponsor will be asking about grades, etc.  The college scholarship was a real "leap of faith" for us.  Our concern was that three years or so into the program she would marry, get pregnant, or for some other reason drop out and not finish school.  It was a real relief to see her graduate.

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2 hours ago, JJReyes said:

My wife and I have discussed the sponsorship approach several times. Our idea is to give P500 per month to pay for miscellaneous expenses while the child is attending school. That would amount to P5,000 per year (10 months school year) or about $100. The problem is we have no way of determining whether or no the student is receiving and using the money for school unless we were residing in the community.

 

Certainly, there’s always a risk that the money goes elsewhere, but since you know what kind of expenses you want to pay for, there’s nothing wrong of asking a few questions about the money spent, once in a while. The reaction of the child (or her parents) to this questions should give you a hint about whether it’s worth continuing or not, I guess?  

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On 6/26/2018 at 11:28 PM, Mike J said:

I agree completely.  The other advantage to being here is meeting the child and monitoring their progress.  It helps establish accountability with the child and I think they work a little harder knowing that the sponsor will be asking about grades, etc.  The college scholarship was a real "leap of faith" for us.  Our concern was that three years or so into the program she would marry, get pregnant, or for some other reason drop out and not finish school.  It was a real relief to see her graduate.

Now the next challenge to defeat if she wants to join the PNP. She will need a PNP officer of high rank to sponsor her through the PNP application process. My BIL was at the top of his class when he graduated with a degree in criminology. Yet it took many years before he actually was able to obtain a position and go to their 6 month bootcamp. That was after getting a PNP General as a sponsor through political connections via the local mayor where the family home is. 6 months later using that same connection his cousin was accepted into the PNP. They both are now assigned to the NCR.

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