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thailend19

I can't believe it, but apparently it's true

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9 hours ago, thailend19 said:

Wood is so much easier to work with and a lot faster and less dangerous. Agree?

Faster yes, easier yes, less dangerous... maybe, but quite possibly it won't last as long.

Even in Australia metal frame houses are becoming more and more common because of termite issues (and the Philippines is in the tropics). The days when wood could be soaked in chemicals that would stop termites eating the wood are long gone and other measures like drilling holes around the perimeter and flowing in chemicals are expensive and also starting to face restrictions.  Bamboo has a natural resistance to termites but other woods... not so much.

And I've never seen termite perimeter treatment done in the Philippines (not saying it can't be done but it can't be everyday practice).

 

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1 hour ago, GeoffH said:

I've never seen termite perimeter treatment done in the Philippines (not saying it can't be done but it can't be everyday practice).

Liloan, Cebu, 2011 I met a foreigner who was getting this treatment done to his house on a regular basis by a Philippine company.  Not everyday practice but I have seen it done in the Philippines.

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1 hour ago, GeoffH said:

Faster yes, easier yes, less dangerous... maybe, but quite possibly it won't last as long.

Even in Australia metal frame houses are becoming more and more common because of termite issues (and the Philippines is in the tropics). The days when wood could be soaked in chemicals that would stop termites eating the wood are long gone and other measures like drilling holes around the perimeter and flowing in chemicals are expensive and also starting to face restrictions.  Bamboo has a natural resistance to termites but other woods... not so much.

And I've never seen termite perimeter treatment done in the Philippines (not saying it can't be done but it can't be everyday practice).

 

You may be right, but unless there are attacks of flying termites, that's the only way they could attack a wood balcony, 10 feet off the ground, which is attached to a cement-built townhouse. Even then, flashing around the base of the balcony further reduces the chances of invasion. I'm from New Orleans, own a number of wood-frame houses as rentals and we have installed flashing karound and between brick piers, holding up the frame homes. It's worked for 15 years so far.

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2 hours ago, scott h said:

2x4x12 are 480 pesos ea 2x6x12 are 720 peso ea

Hey, that's great! Many thanks! The only question left is where can I buy them? Just one or two sources would make my day!

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22 minutes ago, thailend19 said:

The only question left is where can I buy them?

They outfit that built my house carries them. He is a medium size building supply business. I will go out on a limb here and say that if he karries them probably almost everyone does. Look at the Wilcon website for starts. If my guy has them I bet they are readily available :thumbsup:

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10 hours ago, thailend19 said:

You may be right, but unless there are attacks of flying termites, that's the only way they could attack a wood balcony, 10 feet off the ground, which is attached to a cement-built townhouse. Even then, flashing around the base of the balcony further reduces the chances of invasion. I'm from New Orleans, own a number of wood-frame houses as rentals and we have installed flashing karound and between brick piers, holding up the frame homes. It's worked for 15 years so far.

I've see the termite tunnel traveling across concrete walls for good distances, they would just take it in their stride. I assume you haven't seen termite when they swarm, the sky goes dark with them.

Edited by Gary D
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50 minutes ago, Gary D said:

I've see the termite tunnel traveling across concrete walls for good distances,

Yep.  All the way up to the coco-lumber trusses in the roof.  Hungry little devils.  The fellow who built that house sold it before the roof was seriously damaged but I hear, from friends, that it's up for sale again . .  . cheap.

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12 hours ago, thailend19 said:

Hey, that's great! Many thanks! The only question left is where can I buy them? Just one or two sources would make my day!

I forgot to put a link in my post regarding the Email reply I got. https://www.filtratimber.com/

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On 12/27/2018 at 7:32 AM, thailend19 said:

You may be right, but unless there are attacks of flying termites, that's the only way they could attack a wood balcony, 10 feet off the ground, which is attached to a cement-built townhouse. Even then, flashing around the base of the balcony further reduces the chances of invasion. I'm from New Orleans, own a number of wood-frame houses as rentals and we have installed flashing karound and between brick piers, holding up the frame homes. It's worked for 15 years so far.

Yes he is right. Here some species do indeed fly, others crawl and even find ways through concrete.

Why is pretty much all ex pats build in concrete, many of us would love to use timber but not worth the future problems. 

Think carefully before using timber. 

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I was talked out of building my Patio and roof of wood, so want for steel, it was also 1000 bucks cheaper for the whole job done in steel instead of wood. 

 

IMG-20181222-WA0007.jpg

IMG_20181227_182929.jpg

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