Nepal

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Posted

I read this story and it made me wonder about some regulations in different places.

Ten tonnes of aid collections for earthquake survivors is stuck in Catterick… because Nepal's 30% tax on donations means it is too expensive to hand them over 
Country's government imposed tax to 'co-ordinate' relief efforts
Critics say it is 'cashing in' on crisis with aid not reaching those in need
Aid organisers want international pressure to scrap controversial tax
Donations stranded in UK until then as monsoon season approaches Nepal
By KATE PICKLES FOR MAILONLINE
PUBLISHED: 14:58 GMT, 4 June 2015 | UPDATED: 15:45 GMT, 4 June 2015
     
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British donations for victims of the Nepal earthquakes are stuck at Catterick Garrison because of tax restrictions imposed by the country's government.
Ten tonnes of everyday items, from men's shoes to sleeping bags and cooking utensils, is holed up at a church warehouse after Nepal put an income tax of up to 30 per cent on relief goods.
Officials claim the tax is necessary so the government can co-ordinate relief efforts but critics say they are simply 'cashing in' on the crisis.
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Aid mountain: As monsoon season approaches in Nepal, 10 tonnes of useful aid is gathering dust in a warehouse Hollybush Christian Fellowship
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Aid mountain: As monsoon season approaches in Nepal, 10 tonnes of useful aid is gathering dust in a warehouse Hollybush Christian Fellowship
The aid was gathered following April's devastating 7.8-magnitude quake which killed more than 8,000 people, flattened entire villages and left hundreds of thousands homeless in the region. 
Organisers behind the Catterick Garrison-based appeal said they were heartbroken that about half of the items collected were still at the Hollybush Christian Fellowship, near Northallerton, a month after they were due to be delivered.
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Dr Jagannath Sharma, executive member of the British Ghurkha and Nepalese Community, was devastated the donations were not reaching those in need.
'Everybody is donating because they want to get the right aid to the right people at the right time,' he said.  
Aid agencies have voiced mounting frustration over taxes being levied at Nepal's borders, while police have been reported to have stopped trucks loaded with supplies by private well-wishers headed to badly hit areas. 
Dr Sharma called on the international community to put pressure on the Nepalese government to lift taxes so the aid can be distributed. If not, those behind the relief effort said they had 'no idea' what will happen to the items.
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Homeless: A woman carries her young son in a sling with fallen buildings creating a mountain in the background in the Sindhupalchowk district
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Desperate: A woman carries her young son in a sling with fallen buildings creating a mountain in the background in the Sindhupalchowk district, an example of the people desperately in need of the aid stuck at Catterick
Appeal: Organisers hope the international community will put pressure on the Nepalese government to lift taxes on relief
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Appeal: Organisers hope the international community will put pressure on the Nepalese government to lift taxes on relief
Devastated: A woman looks at what remains of her home which has collapsed in the Sindhupalchowk district, with pain etched across her face 
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Devastated: People were left with nothing following the deadly quakes which killed thousands and left thousands more homeless
Another appeal organiser, who asked not to be named, said tonnes of other donations from Catterick Garrison had been shipped to the Red Cross in India, but had not been moved to Nepal because of the taxes.
He said: 'It is very disappointing. People donated goods out of the goodness of their hearts not expecting the Nepalese government to try and make money out of it.
'We are facing a very substantial tax bill to get these goods to people who need them at a time that Nepal's monsoon season is drawing closer and the hundreds of thousands of homeless people need to prepare.'
He said Nepalese people at the garrison had also raised about £20,000 for earthquake victims, but were adamant that the country's government, which has been ranked among the world's most corrupt, would not receive any of it.  
They called for the Nepalese government to work alongside aid agencies to ensure aid reached where it was needed.
Tonnes of donations for Nepal left to waste due to relief tax
 
 Fallen: Women walk past a building which is perilously teetering in the Sindhupalchowk district in Nepal, following a second quake
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In need: Women walk past a building which is perilously teetering in the Sindhupalchowk district in Nepal, following the second quake
Small comforts: This Nepalese man carries his few belongings in an orange cloth while the second quake's catastrophic impact can be seen behind him
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Nothing left: Many Nepalese people are still waiting for aid to reach them more than a month after the earthquakes struck. Critics say the Nepalese government is cashing in on the crisis by introducing a 30% tax for relief 
A Nepalese Embassy spokesman said the relief taxes of between 15 and 30 per cent, depending on the type of good, had been introduced as its government felt it was in the best position to coordinate the humanitarian effort and prevent aid being duplicated.
He said donations sent to the Nepalese government and aid agencies would be exempt from tax.
An Oxfam spokesman said it was continuing to deliver relief items in a number of ways including by air, overland from India and by sourcing them in Nepal itself.
He said the Nepalese government had reinstated some customs duties it waived after the earthquakes, but these did not apply to some priority items like tents and tarpaulin.
He added: 'Oxfam's top priority is to ensure lifesaving aid gets to those who need it most as soon as possible.'
 
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Posted

The way I read this, the foreign do-gooders want to override the Nepalese government and do things their own way.  If it is truly charity then give the stuff to the Nepalese government and let them distribute it how they think best.  Just because you call yourself Oxfam does not mean you are above the law of the country.  I'm sure the Oxfam group means well but when they say: 'Oxfam's top priority is to ensure lifesaving aid gets to those who need it most as soon as possible.'  I see the top priority as getting headlines and ramrodding their own agenda past the local government.  Are they doing this because they think the local government is too corrupt?  It probably is. It probably was before Oxfam came along and it will be still after Oxfam has left.  If they want to help then donate and shut up about it.  Such is my opinion.

 

PS:  considering that Oxfam spends "20 to 30 cents on the donated dollar for overhead and administrative expenses." I think they are the pot calling the kettle black.

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Sorry, but I'm just too lazy to read all that. 

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Sorry, but I'm just too lazy to read all that. 

 

So what is the point of your comment?

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It probably is. It probably was before Oxfam came along and it will be still after Oxfam has left.
PS: considering that Oxfam spends "20 to 30 cents on the donated dollar for overhead and administrative expenses." I think they are the pot calling the kettle black.

Sorry Dave can't agree....80%-70% of something, is better than 100% of nothing!

It's true corruption is in every country these days, but that don't mean we should sit back and do nothing.

The Nepalese government should allow aid through and waver any taxes.

Never bite the hand that feeds you comes to mind or suffer the consequences, trouble is the people at the top dont suffer, while everyone else does.

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He said donations sent to the Nepalese government and aid agencies would be exempt from tax.

They should try that... 

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Sorry Dave can't agree

 

I understand.  There are days when I do not agree with myself either.  Charities do good work.  Management of charities is a tightrope walk.  In this case I think Oxfam should follow biblical advice:  "when you give to the needy, do not let your left hand know what your right hand is doing" http://biblehub.com/niv/matthew/6-3.htm. . .  which means give the donation and walk away without looking to see if corrupt officials are taking more than their share.  (At least thats what it means to me)

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In this case I think Oxfam should follow biblical advice: "when you give to the needy, do not let your left hand know what your right hand is doing" http://biblehub.com/...matthew/6-3.htm. .

I like it Dave,

Did you know that Tax collectors were the most loathed according to the Bible too. :tiphat:

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In this case I think Oxfam should follow biblical advice: "when you give to the needy, do not let your left hand know what your right hand is doing" http://biblehub.com/...matthew/6-3.htm. .

I like it Dave,

Did you know that Tax collectors were the most loathed according to the Bible too. :tiphat:

 

Maybe they were but they never had double glazing salesmen then.

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There are days when I do not agree with myself either

 

Have you been tested for a split personality disorder? 

 

:mocking:

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