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Brief Description Of 13A Visa Process In Cebu:

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I typed up a description of my experience when applying for a 13A Visa so I could share it with you. This was my experience and your experience could be different but that is the Philippines. Even the fees could be different for you. I didn't try to mention all of the documents, requirements, or number of copies you must provide because there are too many for anyone to remember.

Read the information below:

IMMIGRANTS

13(A) The wife or the husband or the unmarried child under twenty-one years of age of a Philippine citizen, if accompanying or following to join such citizen;

Checklist of Requirements for Conversion to Non-Quota Immigrant by Marriage Under Section 13(a)

  1. Request Letter from the petitioner with a statement that all documents submitted were legally obtained from the corresponding government agencies;
  2. Duly accomplished and notarized Consolidated General Application Form (BI Form No. RADJR-2012-01);
  3. Original copy of NSO issued Birth Certificate of the Filipino Spouse;
  4. Original copy of NSO issued Marriage Contract or if the marriage was solemnized abroad, the Original copy of the Marriage Contract Authenticated by the Philippine Embassy/Consulate in or nearest the place where the marriage was solemnized, with English translation if written in other foreign language;
  5. Photocopy of applicant's Passport (bio-page, admission and authorized stay of at least twenty (20) days from date of filing);
  6. Original Copy of Bureau of Immigration (BI) Clearance Certificate.
  7. Joint Affidavit of applicant and petitioner attesting to the authenticity and genuineness of all documents submitted in support of the application;
  8. Proofs of financial capacity of applicant and/or petitioner during their permanent residence in the Philippines.

If in the application the applicant is joined by his/her unmarried minor children:

  1. Duly accomplished and notarized Consolidated General Application Form (BI Form No. RADJR-2012-01);
  2. Original copy of Birth Certificates of unmarried minor children certified or authenticated by the Philippine Embassy/Consulate in or nearest the place where the marriage was solemnized or place of birth, with English translation if written in other foreign language;
  3. Photocopy of the Passport/s of foreign national's dependents; and
  4. Original copy of the Bureau of Immigration (BI) Clearance Certificate.

Download Full Details: Application for Conversion to Non-Quota Immigrant by Marriage (13 A)

Download Application Form For: Immigrant Visa

Checklist of Requirements for Conversion to Temporary Resident’s Visa Under Section 13(a), in relation to Law Instruction No. 33

  1. Request Letter from the Filipino spouse;
  2. Duly accomplished and notarized Consolidated General Application From (BI Form No. RADJR-2012-02);
  3. Original copy of NSO issued Birth Certificate of Filipino Spouse;
  4. Original copy of NSO issued Marriage Contract or if the marriage was solemnized abroad, the Original copy of the Marriage Contract authenticated by the Philippine Embassy/Consulate in or nearest the place where the marriage was solemnized, with English translation if written in other foreign language;
  5. Divorce Decree/Annulment Order or Death Certificate, if applicable;
  6. Original copy of NSO issued Birth Certificate of unmarried child under twenty-one years of age or if born outside the Philippines, the Original copy of Birth Certificate authenticated by the Philippine Embassy/Consulate in or nearest the place of birth, with English translation if written in other foreign language;
  7. Original copy of Bureau of Immigration (BI) Clearance Certificate.
  8. Photocopy of the Passport of alien spouse showing bio-page, validity of the passport, admission and authorized stay of at least twenty (20) days from date of filing;
  9. Joint Affidavit (applicant and petitioner) starting therein the authenticity and genuineness of all documents submitted in support of the application;
  10. Photocopy of Identification document of Filipino spouse like valid passport, company ID, SSS/GSIS, PRC ID, Driver's Licence, Tin or Voter's ID/Registration; and
  11. Proofs of financial capacity to support applicant and petitioner during their temporary residence in the Philippines.

Download Full Details: Application for Conversion to Temporary Resident Visa (TRV)

Download Application Form For: Immigrant Visa

Checklist of Requirements for Visa Extension of Temporary Resident’s Visa Under Section 13(a), in relation to Law Instruction No. 33

  1. Letter of Application by the Filipino spouse;
  2. Duly accomplished and Consolidated General Application Form (BI Form No. RADJR-2012-01);
  3. NSO authenticated copy of Birth Certificate of Filipino spouse;
  4. NSO authenticated copy of the Marriage Contract of alien and Filipino spouse authenticated by the Philippine Embassy / Consulate in or nearest the place where the marriage was solemnized;
  5. Divorce Decree / Annulment Order or Death Certificate, if applicable;
  6. NSO authenticated copy of the Birth Certificates of children;
  7. Original copy of Bureau of Immigration (BI) Clearance Certificate
  8. Photocopy of the Passport of alien spouse showing bio-page, admission and authorized stay of at least (20) days from date of filing;
  9. Joint Affidavit (applicant and petitioner) stating therein the authenticity and genuineness of all documents submitted in support of the petition;
  10. Photocopy of Identification document of Filipino spouse like valid passport, company ID, SSS/GSIS, PRC ID, Driver's License, TIN or Voter's ID/Registration; and
  11. Proofs of financial capacity to support applicant and petitioner during their temporary residence in the Philippines.

Download Full Details: Application for Visa Extension of Temporary Resident's Visa (TRV)

Download Application Form For: Immigrant Visa

Checklist of Requirements for Amendment from Probationary Non-Quota Immigrant Visa to Permanent Resident Visa Under Section 13(a)

  1. Request Letter from the Filipino spouse, with a statement that all documents submitted were legally obtained from the corresponding government agencies;
  2. Duly accomplished and notarized Consolidated General Application Form (BI Form No. RADJR-2012-01);
  3. Photocopy of ACR I-CARD (front and back portion);
  4. Photocopy of applicant's Passport showing its biodata page, visa implementation page and visa page with latest arrival stamp; and
  5. Original copy of Bureau of Immigration (BI) Clerance Certificate;

Download Full Details: Application for Amendment of Probationary Non-Quota Immigrant Visa to Permanent Resident Visa Under Section 13(a)

Download Application Form For: Immigrant Visa

Brief Description of 13A Visa Process in Cebu.doc

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Simple as could be! Actually thanks for getting all this. I have looked around but this looks like a pretty good list. But... 8 trips, huh? It's more fun in the Philippines!

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Rather than having to download it I pasted it here to read. :thumbsup:

Brief Description of 13A Visa Process in Cebu:

​ Author: Americano

1st Trip to BOI – Submit Notarized Application for Probationary 13A Visa, Notarized letter from Wife, Copies of Passport, Copies of Stamps in Passport, 2” X 2” Photos, make Fingerprint Charts and all other required Documents. Pay total of P7,736. In Fees.

2nd Trip to BOI – Interview with BOI Lawyer on the Date and Time given to you.

After Approval (Implementation) of Application return to BOI:

3rd Trip to BOI – Fill out Application to Apply for ACR I-card. On 2nd Floor Make Digital Photos, Fingerprints scanned, all Data Entered on Manila Computer as you verify its correctness on screen.

After 3 months return to BOI:

4th Trip to BOI – Pick up ACR I-card, which is valid for one year.

Two or 3 Months before your ACR I-card expires return to BOI:

5th Trip to BOI – Submit Application for Permanent 13A Visa, Notarized letter from Wife, Copies of Passport, Copies of Stamps in Passport, Photos and all other required Documents. Pay total of P8,754. Fees.

6th Trip to BOI – Interview with BOI Lawyer on the Date and Time given to you.

After Approval (Implementation) of Application return to BOI.

7th Trip to BOI – Apply for ACR I-card. On 2nd Floor Verify correctness of all data on Manila Computer. Paid P310. for Annual Report Fee.

After 1 month return to BOI:

8th Trip to BOI – Pick up ACR I-card which is valid for 5 years.

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Thanks Mr. Bossman, It was after 2am when I stared the topic so I was too tired to figure out why I couldn't paste the information like you did.

Yes, the total process from beginning to end takes 8 visits to BOI, but that's during about a 14 months period. Eight visits seems to be the minimum. I don't know why they can't do the interview while you are already there since it only takes a few minutes. The reason 8 visits is the minimum is if you don't have a document or one of the requirements you will need to come back another day or if you arrive at BOI too late in the day you will not have enough time to complete everything that day and will have to come back.

On January 23 I applied for my Permanent 13A ACR I-card which was my 7th trip to BOI. This morning which was January 25 BOI called me saying they needed a copy of my Marriage Certificate so today my wife and I made our 8th trip to BOI concerning my 13A Visa.

The lesson to be learned is always be prepared for the unexpected.

Edited by Americano
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Thanks for the information. Yesterday, I spent the entire day (precisely 6 1/2 hrs) at the Mandaue BI office on Step 3. 98% of that was waiting for my name to be called after processing all the forms. The other 2% was getting fingerprints twice - once w/ink, once with a digital scanner then a photo. I have to go back in a month to pick up the card (they say). I would never do this again. If you're married, retired, and have no intention to work (that's me) the balikbayan stamp is far easier and has no fees, no BI as long as you leave once a year. Traveling out of the country yearly is actually a healthy and good thing. My opinion only.

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The balikbayan stamp is one I have not really looked into. If it is much easier I may have to check it out too. I got some time to figure it all out still. These forums are a big help! :tiphat:

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Thanks for the information. Yesterday, I spent the entire day (precisely 6 1/2 hrs) at the Mandaue BI office on Step 3. 98% of that was waiting for my name to be called after processing all the forms. The other 2% was getting fingerprints twice - once w/ink, once with a digital scanner then a photo. I have to go back in a month to pick up the card (they say). I would never do this again. If you're married, retired, and have no intention to work (that's me) the balikbayan stamp is far easier and has no fees, no BI as long as you leave once a year. Traveling out of the country yearly is actually a healthy and good thing. My opinion only.

Not that I like to think of 'bad' things happening, but what happens if you go the balikbayan route and your wife dies or becomes unable to travel with you in order to re-enter together? :why-me:

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Not that I like to think of 'bad' things happening, but what happens if you go the balikbayan route and your wife dies or becomes unable to travel with you in order to re-enter together?

You can't go the balikbayan route if your spouse is not with you when you enter the country so that's one benefit of the visa. Another is that you can take advantage of the excellent employment opportunities and work if you choose. Everyone's situation is different. I have no plans to take advantage of all the great jobs here and I live more then 2 hrs from the nearest office. Given the time, expense, and aggravation involved with getting the visa the balikbayan seems (in hindsight) to have been the better choice for me.

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Not that I like to think of 'bad' things happening, but what happens if you go the balikbayan route and your wife dies or becomes unable to travel with you in order to re-enter together?

You can't go the balikbayan route if your spouse is not with you when you enter the country so that's one benefit of the visa. Another is that you can take advantage of the excellent employment opportunities and work if you choose. Everyone's situation is different. I have no plans to take advantage of all the great jobs here and I live more then 2 hrs from the nearest office. Given the time, expense, and aggravation involved with getting the visa the balikbayan seems (in hindsight) to have been the better choice for me.

Are you saying a foreigner can work on a balikbayan visa?

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Are you saying a foreigner can work on a balikbayan visa?

Just the opposite, you cannot. I was referring to the visa (13a).

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